prettyboyshyflizzy:

chillona:

poetic-ness:

l0oooveeeee:

And the church said?

Amen’d

������������������

yaaas u betterrr preachh prettyboyshyflizzy:

chillona:

poetic-ness:

l0oooveeeee:

And the church said?

Amen’d

������������������

yaaas u betterrr preachh prettyboyshyflizzy:

chillona:

poetic-ness:

l0oooveeeee:

And the church said?

Amen’d

������������������

yaaas u betterrr preachh prettyboyshyflizzy:

chillona:

poetic-ness:

l0oooveeeee:

And the church said?

Amen’d

������������������

yaaas u betterrr preachh

prettyboyshyflizzy:

chillona:

poetic-ness:

l0oooveeeee:

And the church said?

Amen’d

������������������

yaaas u betterrr preachh

doncheftw:

thefunksoulbrotha:

If you skip to 1:00 in, the officers are actually blocking and eventually forcing back Missouri State Senator Jamilah Nasheed from entering this building. 

They eventually let her in, but the flagrancy though…The flagrancy I’ve seen in Missouri is wide open.

magnacarterholygrail:

teaforyourginaa:

neptunelovedme:

jaundiceyeyes:

#warready

😩😩😩😩😩

oh shit

[khia voice] WHO. WANT. WAR?

indecisive-bamma:

Let’s leave this here.

choice36c:

"MODERN DAY LYNCHINGS"

Kody (Pretty Boy) Ingham (pictured above) was found hanging from a tree in front of his white girlfriends house on July 15, 2013 (the same night as the George Zimmerman verdict) in Athens, Texas. it was chalked up as a suicide and no investigation ensued, even though two hours prior he called his mother to pick him up from the site he died at. no newspaper article, just a four sentence obituary in the local papers and his family has been trying hard to make any mainstream news channel blow up the story to find the killers.

Roy Veal was found hanging in Woodville, Mississippi in 2004. he originally lived in Seattle and went to his mother’s home in Woodville to help her fight for the rights to their family land against a white man. Oil had been found underneath the land.

Roy’s head was covered with a pillow case and burned papers of the documented proof he had to prove his mothers’ ownership were found burned at his feet. He was later found hanging from a tree. His death was ruled a suicide.

His family is still trying to get attention for the case 

Reynard Johnson, 17, was found hanging from a tree on his front lawn on June 16, 2000 in Kokomo, Mississippi. His death was ruled a suicide even though the belt around his neck was not his. Authorities said since no hate group left a message by the body, there was nothing to investigate. Family members said the motive was his relationship with a white girl, he was constantly being harassed because of this.

pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege. pedazititos:

0salt:


Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege.

pedazititos:

0salt:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

This is an important message on how privilege really works.

it’s good to remember that we shouldn’t only define ourselves by our marginalized identities. for example I am cis, I am middle class, I am educated, I speak English, I am a documented citizen—remember all of those identities you possess that give you privilege.

(Source: exgynocraticgrrl)

thenigerianassassin:

The Wall of Benin

Created by the Edo people of the Benin Empire(1447-1897). Currently located in Benin City, Nigeria.

"They extend for some 16,000 kilometres in all, in a mosaic of more than 500 interconnected settlement boundaries. They cover 6,500 square kilometres and were all dug by the Edo people. In all, they are four times longer than the Great Wall of China, and consumed a hundred times more material than the Great Pyramid of Cheops. They took an estimated 150 million hours of digging to construct, and are perhaps the largest single archaeological phenomenon on the planet."-Fred Pearce

Yet ignorant people still maintain Africa has no significant achievements.

snarkbender:

note-a-bear:

petermorwood:

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals
Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.
At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.
The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

Ancient technology can be really cool…
;->

But brown folks were backwards and technologically incompetent.

UM THIS IS AMAZING
snarkbender:

note-a-bear:

petermorwood:

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals
Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.
At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.
The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

Ancient technology can be really cool…
;->

But brown folks were backwards and technologically incompetent.

UM THIS IS AMAZING
snarkbender:

note-a-bear:

petermorwood:

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals
Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.
At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.
The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

Ancient technology can be really cool…
;->

But brown folks were backwards and technologically incompetent.

UM THIS IS AMAZING
snarkbender:

note-a-bear:

petermorwood:

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals
Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.
At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.
The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

Ancient technology can be really cool…
;->

But brown folks were backwards and technologically incompetent.

UM THIS IS AMAZING

snarkbender:

note-a-bear:

petermorwood:

peashooter85:

Ancient Persian Freezers —- The Yakhchals

Today in the modern world we take freezers, and the frozen results of freezers for granted.  But in ancient times, cold drinks, frozen desserts, and chilled tropical cocktails were a luxury unknown to most people.  However the idea of artificially freezing goods is nothing new.  As far back as 400 BC, the ancient Persians built special freezers called yakhchals.  Yakhchals were large buildings used for storage of ice and foodstuffs during the hot Persian summers.  Typically they were around 60 feet tall, and had a large subterranean storage space dug out from under it.  The Yakhchal itself was made from a special type of mud clay called sarooj which was composed of clay, sand, lime, goat hair, egg whites, and ash mixed in a special proportion which made it extremely resistant to heat transfer.  In other words the inside stayed cool, while heat from the outside was prevented from entering the building because of the thick insulated walls.  This combined with the subterranean storage ensured that whatever goods were stored in the pit stayed cool, as temperatures below ground level are usually around the 60 to 65 degree Fahrenheit range.  However, these designs were not what made a yakhchal a freezer.  There was one other brilliant design feature which ensured that the yakhchal would stay frosty all year long.

At the top of the dome was a small hole, or series of small holes called windcatchers.  Typically windcatchers were pointed in the direction of the prevailing winds.  Due to its conical shape there was always a negative pressure gradient inside the yakhchal.  According to Bernoulli’s Law air flow at a high pressure will always move toward areas of low pressure.  Thus air from the outside was constantly flowing through the yakhchal.  In addition, according to Venturi’s Principal, whenever air flows through a small hole, the smaller the hole, the greater the speed of the flow.  The small hole, or series of holes of the yakhchal ensured that air passed into it at great flows.  What resulted was a great amount of outside air entering into the yakhchal at high speeds.  While the air itself wasn’t cool, the flows at which it was being entrained into the yakhchal created temperatures that were below freezing. Typically the windcatchers were cut in such a way that the incoming jet of air would be directed onto the storage pit.

The ancient Persians primarily used their yakhchals for storing ice and foodstuffs.  During the summer, Persian nobles often enjoyed a frozen treat called faloodeh (pictured above), which is made from thin noodles with syrup made from sugar and rose water, then flavored with lemon, lime, fruits, almond, pistachio, and other flavorings.  Due to the Persian’s freezing technology, faloodeh (which is still popular today) goes down in history as one of the first frozen desserts.  The practice of building and using yakhchals continued up to the 20th century, when they were eventually replaced with modern freezers and refrigerators.

Ancient technology can be really cool…

;->

But brown folks were backwards and technologically incompetent.

UM THIS IS AMAZING

ourblackproject:

For many years, Black superheroes have been dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. Yet the importance of a Storm, Luke Cage, Black Panther, or Jon Stewart as Green Lantern or Miles Morales as Spiderman cannot be understated. Their entry into comic books also served as entry to the hearts and imaginations of black children, confirming that they too can be superheroes and could one day save the world.
For a list of Black Superheroes see here
http://worldofblackheroes.com/black-superheroes/
ourblackproject:

For many years, Black superheroes have been dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. Yet the importance of a Storm, Luke Cage, Black Panther, or Jon Stewart as Green Lantern or Miles Morales as Spiderman cannot be understated. Their entry into comic books also served as entry to the hearts and imaginations of black children, confirming that they too can be superheroes and could one day save the world.
For a list of Black Superheroes see here
http://worldofblackheroes.com/black-superheroes/
ourblackproject:

For many years, Black superheroes have been dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. Yet the importance of a Storm, Luke Cage, Black Panther, or Jon Stewart as Green Lantern or Miles Morales as Spiderman cannot be understated. Their entry into comic books also served as entry to the hearts and imaginations of black children, confirming that they too can be superheroes and could one day save the world.
For a list of Black Superheroes see here
http://worldofblackheroes.com/black-superheroes/

ourblackproject:

For many years, Black superheroes have been dismissed as sidekicks, imitators of established white heroes, or are accused of having no role outside of blaxploitation film contexts. Yet the importance of a Storm, Luke Cage, Black Panther, or Jon Stewart as Green Lantern or Miles Morales as Spiderman cannot be understated. Their entry into comic books also served as entry to the hearts and imaginations of black children, confirming that they too can be superheroes and could one day save the world.

For a list of Black Superheroes see here

http://worldofblackheroes.com/black-superheroes/

saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!
saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!

saucerkommand:

Because you DEMANDED IT, more stunning art from Mshindo Kuumba!

smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love

smallrevolutionary:

chamisul:

tismys:

gxxdgxxn:

A$AP Rocky & Chanel Iman for Vogue September 2014

They look so good 

oh my god

black love

haneefistheonlyone:

Something done right

(Source: afrorevolution)

dynamicafrica:

“The Curse of Community,” Village Voice, January 16, 1996—reprinted in Class Notes: Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene (New Press, 2000) [x] dynamicafrica:

“The Curse of Community,” Village Voice, January 16, 1996—reprinted in Class Notes: Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene (New Press, 2000) [x]

dynamicafrica:

“The Curse of Community,” Village Voice, January 16, 1996—reprinted in
Class Notes: Posing as Politics and Other Thoughts on the American Scene (New Press, 2000) [x]

(Source: ethiopienne)