dynamicafrica:

#LongStreet this morning #latergram #capetown #vscocam (at Long street cape town)

suzannesbantuknots:

The Two Sisters,  2012
Kehinde Wiley

suzannesbantuknots:

The Two Sisters,  2012

Kehinde Wiley

dapperlou:

• Wing Monks• @MrKetShow (at Mrket Show)

kidbuudha:

matokininja:

bloggers-shit:

theafrocentrics:

ezryder71:

theafrocentrics:

I saw this on twitter. This is beautiful.

It’s not beautiful, it’s stupid and degrading! NOBODY should use either!

Shut your dumb ass up.

Always that one person ^^ lmao.

Here let me make it two. IT is stupid and degrading. Nobody should be using either, but your stupid asses just can’t think of a better word to use now can you?

White folks always tryna police what the fuck we say. And then you got these Uncle Tom ass niggas wanting to join in and tap dance for to impress your white “pals”. All y’all can kiss my black ass. It’s sociology 101. Simple shit. I grew around Mexicans my whole life and they used to call each other beaners. You know what would happen if I called one of homies a beaner? I’d get my face sliced up. It’s called cultural relativism, assholes. You take the culture for what it is and you RESPECT THE BOUNDARIES OF SAID CULTURE. Now all y’all shut the fuck up.

curvesincolor:

Cindy.

  1. Camera: iPhone 5s
  2. Aperture: f/2.2
  3. Exposure: 1/16th
  4. Focal Length: 4mm
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx
quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast
Shot by J. Quazi King
http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/
Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx

quazimottoonwax:

Dapper Lou for HypeBeast

Shot by J. Quazi King

http://quazimottoonwax.tumblr.com/

Instagram = @Quazimottoonwx

darvinasafo:

Eric Garner

#icantbreathe darvinasafo:

Eric Garner

#icantbreathe darvinasafo:

Eric Garner

#icantbreathe

darvinasafo:

Eric Garner

#icantbreathe

darvinasafo:

#istaywoke

darvinasafo:

How Racism works…

pussyharvest:

jesuswithalacefront:

gadaboutgreen:

scienceyoucanlove:

How many women can you guess? Do you remember/know what each one of them did/discovered?

Once you make your guess, head over to All Science, All the Time to see if you were right:http://ow.ly/pXjrG

Oh wow, that’s AN AWESOME LIST OF WHITE WOMEN SCIENTISTS! But how could you forget:

Asima Chatterjee: The awesome Indian woman who help discover drugs we use to treat cancer, malaria, and epilepsy!

OR

Chien-Shiung Wu: THE FIRST LADY OF PHYSICS?! 

OR WHADDABOUT

Ellen Ochoa: The first Latina in SPACE! AND the First Latina Director of the Johnson Space Center.

Oo, and don’t forget!!

Flossie Wong-Staal: The woman that successfully map HIV and pave the way to prove that HIV causes AIDS. 

GURL!

Mae Jemison: First Black woman IN SPACE!!! And worked the first flight into space after the Challenger Accident.

But don’t stop!

Patricia Bath: The First Black woman doctor awarded a patent for a medical device: a laser that removes cataracts! (Fancy that!)

AND THE BOSSEST!

Shirley Ann Jackson: The first Black woman to earn a PhD from MIT in nuclear physics.

Hot damn! Women of Color in Science!!! 

reblogging solely for the criticisms and shade.

I’m fucking cackling

pgdigs:

Jan. 17, 1976: Sculptor Selma Burke
Selma Burke, one of the 20th century’s most prolific artists and sculptors, went to the White House in 1943 to draw President Franklin Roosevelt. The semi-classical image she created showed the nation’s leader with his head held high, prominent cheekbones and a taut jaw.
The likeness was intended for a new Recorder of Deeds building in Washington, D.C.  but was later adopted for the dime. First, however, all of the Roosevelts had to approve it.
Eleanor Roosevelt dropped by Burke’s New York studio on Jan. 10, 1945. While Mrs. Roosevelt liked the drawing, she felt the artist had made her husband look too young. But Ms. Burke replied that she wanted the presidential profile to be timeless.
Born into poverty in Mooresville, North Carolina, Ms. Burke dug her fingers into riverbank clay as child. She was one of 10 children born to an Episcopal minister and a mother who did clerical work and lived to be 103. The family moved to Washington, D.C.  and Philadelphia.
Ms. Burke arrived in Harlem for that neighborhood’s famous cultural renaissance during the 1920s. She earned her living as a nurse but continued to study art during the Depression. 
She married Claude McKay, a poet and one of the older Harlem Renaissance figures. The couple’s social circle included the witty Dorothy Parker, novelist Sinclair Lewis, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, poet Langston Hughes, singer Ethel Waters and artist Max Eastman. 
The couple had a stormy marriage and later divorced.
In the 1930s, Ms. Burke traveled to Europe, where, along with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, she studied drawing with Henri Matisse in Paris.
After World War II broke out, Ms. Burke joined the U.S. Navy, driving a truck at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  While on the job, she injured three discs in her back and was hospitalized. Doctors told her she would not walk again.
Regardless, she entered the nationwide competition to draw President Roosevelt and won. 
Her other work included likenesses of Booker T. Washington, abolitionist John Brown and President Calvin Coolidge. Her sculpture also can be seen at Hill House in the city’s Hill District.  
Ms. Burke taught art in Pittsburgh for 17 years and operated her Selma Burke Art Center in East Liberty from 1972 to 1981. 
In 1979, Ms. Burke was 78 when she was honored for her contributions to visual arts at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. He praised her as a “shining beacon” for aspiring artists. 
Ms. Burke retired to New Hope, Pa., where she died at age 94 in 1995.
— Marylynne Pitz
pgdigs:

Jan. 17, 1976: Sculptor Selma Burke
Selma Burke, one of the 20th century’s most prolific artists and sculptors, went to the White House in 1943 to draw President Franklin Roosevelt. The semi-classical image she created showed the nation’s leader with his head held high, prominent cheekbones and a taut jaw.
The likeness was intended for a new Recorder of Deeds building in Washington, D.C.  but was later adopted for the dime. First, however, all of the Roosevelts had to approve it.
Eleanor Roosevelt dropped by Burke’s New York studio on Jan. 10, 1945. While Mrs. Roosevelt liked the drawing, she felt the artist had made her husband look too young. But Ms. Burke replied that she wanted the presidential profile to be timeless.
Born into poverty in Mooresville, North Carolina, Ms. Burke dug her fingers into riverbank clay as child. She was one of 10 children born to an Episcopal minister and a mother who did clerical work and lived to be 103. The family moved to Washington, D.C.  and Philadelphia.
Ms. Burke arrived in Harlem for that neighborhood’s famous cultural renaissance during the 1920s. She earned her living as a nurse but continued to study art during the Depression. 
She married Claude McKay, a poet and one of the older Harlem Renaissance figures. The couple’s social circle included the witty Dorothy Parker, novelist Sinclair Lewis, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, poet Langston Hughes, singer Ethel Waters and artist Max Eastman. 
The couple had a stormy marriage and later divorced.
In the 1930s, Ms. Burke traveled to Europe, where, along with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, she studied drawing with Henri Matisse in Paris.
After World War II broke out, Ms. Burke joined the U.S. Navy, driving a truck at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  While on the job, she injured three discs in her back and was hospitalized. Doctors told her she would not walk again.
Regardless, she entered the nationwide competition to draw President Roosevelt and won. 
Her other work included likenesses of Booker T. Washington, abolitionist John Brown and President Calvin Coolidge. Her sculpture also can be seen at Hill House in the city’s Hill District.  
Ms. Burke taught art in Pittsburgh for 17 years and operated her Selma Burke Art Center in East Liberty from 1972 to 1981. 
In 1979, Ms. Burke was 78 when she was honored for her contributions to visual arts at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. He praised her as a “shining beacon” for aspiring artists. 
Ms. Burke retired to New Hope, Pa., where she died at age 94 in 1995.
— Marylynne Pitz
pgdigs:

Jan. 17, 1976: Sculptor Selma Burke
Selma Burke, one of the 20th century’s most prolific artists and sculptors, went to the White House in 1943 to draw President Franklin Roosevelt. The semi-classical image she created showed the nation’s leader with his head held high, prominent cheekbones and a taut jaw.
The likeness was intended for a new Recorder of Deeds building in Washington, D.C.  but was later adopted for the dime. First, however, all of the Roosevelts had to approve it.
Eleanor Roosevelt dropped by Burke’s New York studio on Jan. 10, 1945. While Mrs. Roosevelt liked the drawing, she felt the artist had made her husband look too young. But Ms. Burke replied that she wanted the presidential profile to be timeless.
Born into poverty in Mooresville, North Carolina, Ms. Burke dug her fingers into riverbank clay as child. She was one of 10 children born to an Episcopal minister and a mother who did clerical work and lived to be 103. The family moved to Washington, D.C.  and Philadelphia.
Ms. Burke arrived in Harlem for that neighborhood’s famous cultural renaissance during the 1920s. She earned her living as a nurse but continued to study art during the Depression. 
She married Claude McKay, a poet and one of the older Harlem Renaissance figures. The couple’s social circle included the witty Dorothy Parker, novelist Sinclair Lewis, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, poet Langston Hughes, singer Ethel Waters and artist Max Eastman. 
The couple had a stormy marriage and later divorced.
In the 1930s, Ms. Burke traveled to Europe, where, along with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, she studied drawing with Henri Matisse in Paris.
After World War II broke out, Ms. Burke joined the U.S. Navy, driving a truck at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  While on the job, she injured three discs in her back and was hospitalized. Doctors told her she would not walk again.
Regardless, she entered the nationwide competition to draw President Roosevelt and won. 
Her other work included likenesses of Booker T. Washington, abolitionist John Brown and President Calvin Coolidge. Her sculpture also can be seen at Hill House in the city’s Hill District.  
Ms. Burke taught art in Pittsburgh for 17 years and operated her Selma Burke Art Center in East Liberty from 1972 to 1981. 
In 1979, Ms. Burke was 78 when she was honored for her contributions to visual arts at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. He praised her as a “shining beacon” for aspiring artists. 
Ms. Burke retired to New Hope, Pa., where she died at age 94 in 1995.
— Marylynne Pitz
pgdigs:

Jan. 17, 1976: Sculptor Selma Burke
Selma Burke, one of the 20th century’s most prolific artists and sculptors, went to the White House in 1943 to draw President Franklin Roosevelt. The semi-classical image she created showed the nation’s leader with his head held high, prominent cheekbones and a taut jaw.
The likeness was intended for a new Recorder of Deeds building in Washington, D.C.  but was later adopted for the dime. First, however, all of the Roosevelts had to approve it.
Eleanor Roosevelt dropped by Burke’s New York studio on Jan. 10, 1945. While Mrs. Roosevelt liked the drawing, she felt the artist had made her husband look too young. But Ms. Burke replied that she wanted the presidential profile to be timeless.
Born into poverty in Mooresville, North Carolina, Ms. Burke dug her fingers into riverbank clay as child. She was one of 10 children born to an Episcopal minister and a mother who did clerical work and lived to be 103. The family moved to Washington, D.C.  and Philadelphia.
Ms. Burke arrived in Harlem for that neighborhood’s famous cultural renaissance during the 1920s. She earned her living as a nurse but continued to study art during the Depression. 
She married Claude McKay, a poet and one of the older Harlem Renaissance figures. The couple’s social circle included the witty Dorothy Parker, novelist Sinclair Lewis, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, poet Langston Hughes, singer Ethel Waters and artist Max Eastman. 
The couple had a stormy marriage and later divorced.
In the 1930s, Ms. Burke traveled to Europe, where, along with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, she studied drawing with Henri Matisse in Paris.
After World War II broke out, Ms. Burke joined the U.S. Navy, driving a truck at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  While on the job, she injured three discs in her back and was hospitalized. Doctors told her she would not walk again.
Regardless, she entered the nationwide competition to draw President Roosevelt and won. 
Her other work included likenesses of Booker T. Washington, abolitionist John Brown and President Calvin Coolidge. Her sculpture also can be seen at Hill House in the city’s Hill District.  
Ms. Burke taught art in Pittsburgh for 17 years and operated her Selma Burke Art Center in East Liberty from 1972 to 1981. 
In 1979, Ms. Burke was 78 when she was honored for her contributions to visual arts at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. He praised her as a “shining beacon” for aspiring artists. 
Ms. Burke retired to New Hope, Pa., where she died at age 94 in 1995.
— Marylynne Pitz

pgdigs:

Jan. 17, 1976: Sculptor Selma Burke

Selma Burke, one of the 20th century’s most prolific artists and sculptors, went to the White House in 1943 to draw President Franklin Roosevelt. The semi-classical image she created showed the nation’s leader with his head held high, prominent cheekbones and a taut jaw.

The likeness was intended for a new Recorder of Deeds building in Washington, D.C.  but was later adopted for the dime. First, however, all of the Roosevelts had to approve it.

Eleanor Roosevelt dropped by Burke’s New York studio on Jan. 10, 1945. While Mrs. Roosevelt liked the drawing, she felt the artist had made her husband look too young. But Ms. Burke replied that she wanted the presidential profile to be timeless.

Born into poverty in Mooresville, North Carolina, Ms. Burke dug her fingers into riverbank clay as child. She was one of 10 children born to an Episcopal minister and a mother who did clerical work and lived to be 103. The family moved to Washington, D.C.  and Philadelphia.

Ms. Burke arrived in Harlem for that neighborhood’s famous cultural renaissance during the 1920s. She earned her living as a nurse but continued to study art during the Depression.

She married Claude McKay, a poet and one of the older Harlem Renaissance figures. The couple’s social circle included the witty Dorothy Parker, novelist Sinclair Lewis, the playwright Eugene O’Neill, poet Langston Hughes, singer Ethel Waters and artist Max Eastman.

The couple had a stormy marriage and later divorced.

In the 1930s, Ms. Burke traveled to Europe, where, along with photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson, she studied drawing with Henri Matisse in Paris.

After World War II broke out, Ms. Burke joined the U.S. Navy, driving a truck at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.  While on the job, she injured three discs in her back and was hospitalized. Doctors told her she would not walk again.

Regardless, she entered the nationwide competition to draw President Roosevelt and won.

Her other work included likenesses of Booker T. Washington, abolitionist John Brown and President Calvin Coolidge. Her sculpture also can be seen at Hill House in the city’s Hill District.  

Ms. Burke taught art in Pittsburgh for 17 years and operated her Selma Burke Art Center in East Liberty from 1972 to 1981.

In 1979, Ms. Burke was 78 when she was honored for her contributions to visual arts at the White House by President Jimmy Carter. He praised her as a “shining beacon” for aspiring artists.

Ms. Burke retired to New Hope, Pa., where she died at age 94 in 1995.

— Marylynne Pitz

classicethnichistoricalvibez:

In 1947, Dr. Marie Daly became the first African-American woman to earn a Ph.D. in Chemistry when she graduated from Columbia University. A trailblazer in the field of biochemistry, Dr. Daly researched the connection between high cholesterol and heart disease. #WomenInSTEM (Photo courtesy of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, D. Samuel Gottesman Library Archives)

Click to see source of picture

entergalacticfuckery:

bunniesinpajamas:

girltheresnothininyoureyes:

dear people who hates michael, eat this gifset!

But the media won’t let y’all ever see this

THIS!

(Source: talkindangerbaby)

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.
These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:
“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”
Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.
www.care2.com


I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.
Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.

afrodiaspores:

knowledgeequalsblackpower:

talesofthestarshipregeneration:

medievalpoc:

the-history-of-fighting:

Dahomey’s Warrior Women

Speaking of West Africa, the Dahomey Warrior Women involves a fascinating history that spans nearly 200 years. It was during this time that the elite squad of female warriors fought and died for the border rights and inter-tribal issues in the ancient kingdom of Dahomey.

These women, who outranked their male counterparts, were given far more privileges, including the ability to  come and go from the palaces as they pleased (unlike the men). They were so revered for their warrior prowess, The Smithsonian explains, that men were taught to keep their distance:

“Recruiting women into the Dahomean army was not especially difficult, despite the requirement to climb thorn hedges and risk life and limb in battle. Most West African women lived lives of forced drudgery. Gezo’s female troops lived in his compound and were kept well supplied with tobacco, alcohol and slaves – as many as 50 to each warrior, according to the noted traveler Sir Richard Burton, who visited Dahomey in the 1860s. And “when amazons walked out of the palace,” notes Alpern, “they were preceded by a slave girl carrying a bell. The sound told every male to get out of their path, retire a certain distance, and look the other way.” To even touch these women meant death.”

Yet as colonialist ambitions grew in the region, the Dahomey female warriors eventually grew sparse. Fierce combat missions to crush the independent kingdom eventually succeeded, and in the 1940s, it is said that the last of the female warriors died.

www.care2.com

I’ve posted about this incredible military force for 1800s Week previously, and you can read more about women warriors of color in this Masterpost. There’s also Amazons of Black Sparta: The Women Warriors of Dahomey by Stanley B. Alpern.

So somebody eplain to me why the hell that book author decided that Greek’s people’s history was needed to legitimate Black people’s lives and accomplishments?! 

Dahomey nation is also one of the places in ancient Africa where homosexuality among the women was documented.

Just adding this cause “there was no homosexuality before the white man came” is a popular lie.

Those interested would be better served by checking out Edna G. Bay’s Wives of the Leopard: Gender, Politics and Culture in the Kingdom of Dahomey (University of Virginia Press, 1998):

Looking at Dahomey against the backdrop of the Atlantic slave trade and the growth of European imperialism, Edna G. Bay reaches for a distinctly Dahomean perspective as she weaves together evidence drawn from travelers’ memoirs and local oral accounts, from the religious practices of vodun, and from ethnographic studies of the twentieth century. Wives of the Leopard thoroughly integrates gender into the political analysis of state systems, effectively creating a social history of power…[T]he book provides an accessible portrait of Dahomey’s complex and fascinating culture without exoticizing it.

A free preview is here.